Poetry Challenge For Kids

April 2015



Read Poems – Can’t Wait, April 1, 2015 | Strange Looks, April 2, 2015 | Shrinking, April 3, 2015 | Good Choice, April 4, 2015 | When I Was Younger, April 5, 2015 | Silly Selfie, April 6, 2015Nature, April 7, 2015 | The Chase, April 8, 2015 | Not Here, April 9, 2015 | Accidental Meeting, April 10, 2015 | After All, April 11, 2015 | Something In The Air, April 12, 2015 | A Different Answer, April 13, 2015 | Where I’m Going, April 14, 2015 | Secrets, April 15, 2015 | The Day I Was Born, April 16, 2015| Next Year, April 17, 2015Uncomfortable Time, April 18, 2015 | Night Light, April 19, 2015 | A Different Language, April 20, 2015 | Imaginary Animal, April 21, 2015 | A Conversation With Someone I Don’t Like, April 22, 2015 | The Way Home, April 23, 2015 | Wrong Answer, April 24, 2015 | Someone I Remember, April 26, 2015Something I Used To Have, April 26, 2015 | Favorite Song, April 27, 2015 | Middle of the Road/April 28, 2015 | Something Is Moving That Shouldn’t Be, April 29, 2015 Three Wishes, April 30, 2015



 

Click here to subscribe to the 30/30 Poetry Kids mailing list for updates and to receive the daily prompts.

WordXWord’s 30/30 Poetry Kids challenge is a safe zone where young poets, K – 8 face the challenge of writing a poem a day for 30 days during April, National Poetry Month.

The challenge is essentially the same as adults take with the
30/30 Poetry Challenge (3030poetry.com) –

  • Teachers, parents and mentors sign up young poets (a class, a community group or an individual) to receive a daily, age-appropriate writing prompt.
  • Young poets have 24 hours to tackle the day’s challenge, write a poem – as long or short, happy or sad, traditional or off-beat as they like.
  • Young poets – with parent’s permission – or teachers, mentors or parents submit the poem via email.
  • Poems are “published” in the kid and family-friendly environment of the 30/30 Poetry Kids website.
  • Young poets’ work can be attributed to first name, initials or even a pen name (no last names or full names).

Click here to subscribe to the 30/30 Poetry Kids mailing list for updates and to receive the daily prompts.

We recommend giving the students school or group credit when possible. This isn’t required, but we imagine there is an opportunity for friendly competition between schools in regard to number of participants or number of poems submitted. For example – “Bobby, Reed Middle School

Educators and mentors are encouraged to use the 30/30 Challenge as a motivational tool.